Iraq, 2003-2004

In the Summer of 2003, a young man fresh out of grad school decided to go to Iraq to make a difference and to find himself. He was quickly thrown into a world completely foreign from anything he previously knew, in an office with 12 local Iraqi translators who welcomed him, but at the same time were suspicious of his intentions. His book, Tales From The Tigris, tells the story of how one American and his team of Iraqi translators learned to put aside their differences to work together and learn from each other amidst a confusing conflict that challenged and threatened their relationship on a daily basis. 

A Fireside Chat with Bill Putnam, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army

7-8pm, Monday, May 6

FDR Suite (B-17), Adams House

12 students only. RSVP required: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10C0E44AEAD29A4FA7-iraq

Capitalism: What’s working. What’s not. 4/8

 

Join Nick Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn for an intimate off-record discussion about capitalism by FDR’s fireplace.

In this age of globalization, automation, inequality, and climate change, do we need a new reckoning around capitalism and regulation like the one FDR provided in the 1930s?

Monday, April 8, 7:30-8:30pm, at the FDR Suite (Adams House B-17)

Limited to ten students. Undergraduates only. RSVP required.

 

Sheryl WuDunn
Hauser Visiting Leader, HKS Center for Public Leadership (Spring 2019)

Founder, FullSky Partners; Pulitzer Prize Winner

Sheryl WuDunn, the first Asian-American reporter to win a Pulitzer Prize, is a business executive, lecturer, and best-selling author. Currently, she is co-founder of FullSky Partners, which works with socially-driven ventures, and a Venture Partner at Piedmont Partners Group Ventures, a small private equity group based in San Francisco.

Previously, Ms. WuDunn served as a vice president in the investment management division at Goldman, Sachs & Co. and as a commercial loan officer at Bankers Trust. She also worked at The New York Times as both an executive and journalist notably as a foreign correspondent for The Times in Tokyo and Beijing, where she wrote about economic, financial, political and social issues.

She is co-author of Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, a New York Times best-selling book about the challenges facing women around the globe.

With her husband Nicholas D. Kristof, she has co-authored two best-selling books about Asia: Thunder from the East and China Wakes. She and her husband are recipients of a Pulitzer Prize for their work covering China. Most recently, WuDunn and Kristof authored A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity that also inspired a PBS-documentary, which both provide a unique and essential narrative about making a difference in the world — and a roadmap to becoming a conscientious global citizen.

Ms. WuDunn received the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Lifetime Achievement in 2011. That year Newsweek cited Ms. WuDunn as one of the “150 Women Who Shake the World.”

She graduated from Cornell University, where she is a member of the Board of Trustees. She earned an MBA from Harvard Business School and an MPA from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School. She is a recipient of honorary degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and Middlebury College. She was a Senior Lecturer at Yale University’s Jackson Institute for Global Affairs in fall, 2011.

 

Nicholas Kristof
Hauser Visiting Leader, HKS Center for Public Leadership (Spring 2019)

Op-ed Columnist, The New York Times; Pulitzer Prize winner

Nicholas D. Kristof, a columnist for The Times since 2001, is a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner who writes op-ed columns that appear twice a week. Mr. Kristof grew up on a sheep and cherry farm near Yamhill, Oregon. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Harvard College and then studied law at Oxford University on a Rhodes Scholarship.

After joining The New York Times in 1984, initially covering economics, he served as a Times correspondent in Los Angeles, Hong Kong, Beijing and Tokyo. He later was Associate Managing Editor of The Times, responsible for Sunday editions. In 1990 Mr. Kristof and his wife, Sheryl WuDunn, then also a Times journalist, won a Pulitzer Prize for their coverage of China’s Tiananmen Square democracy movement. Mr. Kristof won a second Pulitzer in 2006, for commentary for what the judges called “his graphic, deeply reported columns that, at personal risk, focused attention on genocide in Darfur and that gave voice to the voiceless in other parts of the world.”

In his column, Mr. Kristof was an early opponent of the Iraq war. He among the first to warn that we were losing ground to the Taliban in southern Afghanistan and raise doubts about WMD in Iraq.

Mr. Kristof and Ms. WuDunn are authors of China Wakes: The Struggle for the Soul of a Rising Power, and Thunder from the East: Portrait of a Rising Asia. Together they wrote Half the Sky: From Oppression to Opportunity for Women Worldwide, which was the inspiration of The Half the Sky Movement that seeks to ignite the change needed to put an end to the oppression of women and girls worldwide. Most recently, Kristof and WuDunn authored A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity that also inspired a PBS-documentary, which both provide a unique and essential narrative about making a difference in the world — and a roadmap to becoming a conscientious global citizen.

Death in the Polis: Warfare and Urban Centers in the 21st Century 4/23

Renewed great power competition, the continued rise of forces challenging the nation state, climate change, and increasing levels of urbanization and global interconnectedness will ensure the world’s urban areas increasingly factor into US national security interests.  Any effort to secure US interests will likely involve the US military, but is it trained and ready to conduct urban operations in an era of increasing urbanization? 

Come and join Lieutenant Colonels Goedecke and Putnam for a fireside chat that will provide some deep insights.

Tuesday, April 23, 7-8pm, in the FDR Suite (Adams B-17)

Twelve students, only.

RSVP required, here: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0e44aead29a4fa7-urban

What effect does the US global military presence have on world opinion? 4/3

On the eve NATO’s 70th anniversary, as American bombers redeploy to Europe for the first time in decades, it is essential to discuss the implications of US military operations around the world.  Those operations – especially those meant to be seen – send messages to US allies and adversaries alike.  Are they the correct messages and are they received in the manner intended? 

Bryan Bailey is an Air Force cargo pilot, who in more than 17 years of operational experience has flown US military aircraft to 58 different countries on all 7 continents.  He has knowingly, and unknowingly, been part of many of those missions.  From humanitarian aid to Haiti and Iran, to counter drug support in Columbia – from airlifting Mongolian troops to the warzone, to taking Jordanians home – from combat airdrop resupply of isolated units in Afghanistan, to medivac of US wounded inside the lifesaving “golden hour” – no one questions the US military’s ability to move around the globe – at least not yet. 

As freedom of navigation through the sea, air, space and cyberspace becomes contested, how or even should the US continue to assume dominance as a global power projector?

Wednesday, April 3, 7-8pm in the FDR Suite (Adams House B-17)

Twelve students only, RSVP required: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10C0E44AEAD29A4FA7-what

 

China Trends Conference 4/26

During World War II, as FDR developed his vision for a post-war global order, he made a surprising decision. Against the wishes of his closest ally, Winston Churchill, FDR envisioned a world where China played a leading role as a great power. Given China’s dim prospects at the time, Roosevelt’s prediction was remarkably foresighted.

Come learn about the main trends that will affect China’s strategic behavior in the near future with the European Center of Excellence for Countering Hybrid Threats (Hybrid CoE), a joint EU-NATO project.

Experts from over a dozen EU and NATO countries will be at Adams House in April preparing a set of reports on the internal and external factors that will drive China’s strategic behavior over the next few years. The experts* have agreed to share their initial findings with the Harvard community on Friday, April 26, 11:00am-12:30pm, in the Lower Common Room of Adams House (26 Plympton St., Cambridge).

RSVP Required

*Gunther Hauser, Una Bērziņa-Čerenkova, Matti Nojonen, and Juliette Genevaz will be presenting on behalf of the 14 experts

More information on the Hybrid CoE, below.

 

 

The European Center of Excellence for Countering Hybrid Threats (Hybrid CoE), joint EU-NATO Center of Excellence is an international hub operating through our networks of practitioners and experts. Our goal is to build member states’ and institutions’ capabilities and enhance EU-NATO cooperation in countering hybrid threats.

  • 20 participating countries: Austria, Canada, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Poland, Romania, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, the UK, the US.

  • Hybrid threat can be characterized as coordinated and synchronized action, that deliberately targets democratic states’ and institutions systemic vulnerabilities, through a wide range of means

The functions of Hybrid CoE include the following:

  • to investigate and examine hybrid influencing targeted to Western democracies by state and non-state actors and to map participants vulnerabilities and improve their resilience and response

  • to conduct tailored training and arrange scenario-based exercises for practitioners aimed at enhancing the member states individual capabilities, as well as interoperability between and among member states, the EU and NATO for countering hybrid threats;

  • to conduct research and analysis into hybrid threats and methods to counter such threats;

  • to engage with and invite dialogue with governmental, non-governmental experts and practitioners from a wide range of professional sectors and disciplines aiming at improving situational awareness of hybrid threats.

 

 

 

21st Century Adversarial Narratives

Are foreign powers working to influence domestic public opinion? Do their approaches differ from political parties? From each other?

Come join Will Stevens, Director of the Public Diplomacy Division, Foreign Service Institute (U.S. Department of State), for a discussion of the practice of public diplomacy, globally, today. 

Will will focus on “Adversarial Narratives” and their use by states, non-state actors, and domestic political parties. He’ll also speak about his work training U.S. diplomats to represent the United States in challenging times, American influence around the world, and how public diplomacy intersects with disinformation, social media, and Hybrid/Gray Zone warfare.

Open to the extended Harvard community, including all Harvard schools, alumni, and neighboring universities

This event is part of the “Misinformation Speaker Series,” and is co-sponsored by the Shorenstein Center at HKS and Northeastern University

Date: 12/10/2018 (Mon.)

Time: 11:30am – 1:00pm EST

Location: Lower Common Room, Adams House, 26 Plympton Street