Combating Fake News: An Agenda for Research and Action 2/17


[Note: this event at Harvard Law School on Friday 17 February is currently full, but if you are a current Harvard undergraduate with a real interest in the topic please reach out to Jed and he’ll see what he can do.]

Combating Fake News: An Agenda for Research and Action
Harvard Law School

Agenda 17 February

8:00 – 8:30am | Continental breakfast
8:30 – 8:45am | Welcome by Nicco Mele, Introduction by Matt Baum (Harvard) and David Lazer (Northeastern): The science of fake news: what is to be done?

MORNING SESSION: FOUNDATIONS
How and why is fake news a problem? What are the underlying individual and aggregate processes that underlie its capacity to do harm?

8:45 – 10:30am | Panel 1: The psychology of fake news
How do people determine what information to attend to, and what to believe?
How does fake news fit into this picture?
● Moderator: Maya Sen, Harvard
● Panelists: Brendan Nyhan (Dartmouth), Adam Berinsky (MIT), Emily Thorson (Boston College), Steven Sloman (Brown), Gordon Pennycook (Yale), Miriam Metzger (UC Santa Barbara)

10:30 – 10:45am | Coffee break

10:45 – 12:30pm | Panel 2: How fake news spreads
How does information spread amongst people in the current news ecosystem?
How is this driven by our social ties, by social media platforms, and by “traditional” media? What lessons can be learned from history?
● Moderator: Nicco Mele, Harvard
● Panelists: David Lazer (Northeastern), Filippo Menczer (Indiana), Michael Schudson (Columbia), Kelly Greenhill (Tufts and Harvard Belfer Center), Yochai Benkler (Harvard), Duncan Watts (Microsoft Research)

12:30 – 1:00pm | Lunch (bag lunch to be provided)

AFTERNOON SESSION: IMPLICATIONS AND INTERVENTIONS

1:00 – 2:45pm | Panel 3: Responses by Public and Private Institutions
What role is there for public institutions (e.g., local, state and federal government) to combat fake news and its harmful effects? What role is there for private actors (e.g., social media companies, scholars, NGO’s, activists) to combat fake news and its harmful effects? Note: this panel is off-the-record.
● Moderator: Tarek Masoud, Harvard
● Panelists: Greg Marra (Facebook), Katherine Brown (Council on Foreign Relations), Lori Robertson (FactCheck.org), Eli Pariser (UpWorthy), David Rothschild (Microsoft Research), Adam Sharp (former head of News, Government, and Elections, Twitter)

2:45 – 3:00pm | Closing remarks (Matt Baum and David Lazer)


The Rule of Law in Mexico and Beyond 2/17


Limited to 10 participants. RSVP required.

How to Survive a Russian Hack


In response to Donald Trump’s executive order banning citizens of seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States, Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham issued a joint statement on Sunday arguing that the measure would “do more to help terrorist recruitment than improve our security.” In response, Trump took to Twitter. “The two Senators should focus their energies on ISIS, illegal immigration and border security instead of always looking to start World War III,” he tweeted.

This invocation of World War III, which he also made in Charlotte, North Carolina during the campaign (“You’re going to end up in World War III over Syria if we listen to Hillary Clinton”) bears a striking similarity to those aired by Russia’s state-owned media, as Anne Applebaum pointed out in October. Russian state media outlets favor headlines like “Are NATO’s Massive War Games on Russia’s Border a Pretext to World War III?” from Sputnik in May 2016, or “US Bombing Syrian Army Would Start World War III,” from the same site in October, and “Trump’s Victory Prevented World War 3” from November. Lately, Russian state media have suggested that Trump has been battling a coup to remove him from office since before inauguration. “Is the United States facing a coup d’état?” a British RT columnist wrote in December.

These headlines are characteristic of the disinformation campaigns the Kremlin uses to frighten and destabilize its eastern European neighbors. The precise nature of Russian state-backed interference in the last November’s U.S. presidential election and the contact, if any, between Russian officials and members of President Trump’s election campaign, may never be fully known. But the apocalyptic stylings of Russian disinformation have reached across the Atlantic. Resisting this strain of anxious rhetoric means looking to its origin.

Read the rest of Linda Kinstler’s article, featuring the FDR Foundation’s “Defense of Democracy” work, at The Atlantic.

 


Unleashing the Girl Effect 2/10


How can creative action cultivate girls as advocates for gender equality?

Join Beyond Tomorrow allies Creative Action Institute (CAI) for appetizers & cocktails to take part in the conversation!

This event is hosted by CAI, and RSVP is required. Their Eventbrite link can be found here.

Clare Dowd and Yasmin Padamsee of CAI will share the approach to integrate arts-based training to deepen the scope and impact of their work to cultivate at-risk adolescent girls in East Africa as advocates for girls’ human rights in their families, schools and communities, and explore undertaking this much needed work in the U.S.

When: Friday, February 10 5:30 – 7:30PM
Where: FDR Suite, Adams House
 B-17

Contact: Julia D’Orazio 978.998.7994/julia@creativeactioninstitute.org.

 
CAI works at the intersection of creativity and social change. We build the capacity of leaders and organizations for innovation, collaboration and resilience to advance conservation, health and human rights globally through original initiatives, experiential training and collaborative projects that harness the power of art and creative processes.


When Presidents Fear: A Program on the Consequences of Xenophobia in America 3/4


Franklin Roosevelt is remembered for “We have nothing to fear but fear itself,” the ringing words of his first inaugural address with which he inspired courage and hope in a nation devastated by the Great Depression.  Then, on the brink of American engagement in World War II, he led the fight for a post-war world founded on the Four Freedoms—Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Religion, Freedom from Fear and Freedom from Want—Everywhere in the World.

How and why then did he sign Executive Order 9066, which led to the internment of more than 110,000 Japanese Americans?

It is now justly condemned as one of the greatest violations of civil liberties in our nation’s history.

Today fear leads many to think it necessary to sacrifice civil liberties once again. Join us to consider the lessons of this tragic history through a lively panel discussion on the consequences of xenophobia with three nationally lauded historians. Afterwards, over refreshments, we’ll screen “From a Silk Cocoon: A Japanese American Renunciation Story,” an award-winning documentary by Satsuki Ina.

Schedule

Location: Adams House LCR

2:00   Welcome Michael Weishan, Executive Director, Franklin Delano Roosevelt Foundation

2:15-3:45  Panel Discussion “When Presidents Fear” with Blanche Wiesen Cook, Jed Willard, Greg Robinson, Cynthia Koch, moderator. The panel will explore the consequences of Order 9006, Eleanor Roosevelts courageous vision regarding race and rescue in the fascist era, and the dangers of xenophobia in America, past and present.

3:45-4:00 Break

4:00 -5:15   Refreshments & Film Screening  “From a Silk Cocoon: A Japanese American Renunciation Story,” award winning documentary by Satsuki Ina.

SIGN UP INFORMATION HERE

 

Participants

SATSUKI INA  is Professor Emeritus, California State University, Sacramento She was born in the Tule Lake Segregation Center, a maximum security prison camp for “disloyals”. Her parents, American citizens, were incarcerated for 4 years during WWII. She is a psychotherapist in private practice specializing in the treatment of collective and historic trauma. Her documentary films, Children of the Camps (2000) and From A Silk Cocoon (2007) have been broadcast nationally on PBS and From A Silk Cocoon was awarded the Northern California Emmy for outstanding historical and cultural program. Dr. Ina’s book, “Non-Alien”: A Japanese American Story will be released for publication by Stone Bridge Books in April 2018.

 

 

 

 

CYNTHIA M. KOCH is Historian in Residence and Director of History Programing for the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Foundation at Adams House, Harvard University. She was Director of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, New York (1999-2011) and subsequently Senior Adviser to the Office of Presidential Libraries, National Archives, Washington, D.C. From 2013-16 she was Public Historian in Residence at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY where she taught courses in public history and Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt.  Her most recent publications are “They Hated Eleanor, Too,” “Hillary R[oosevelt] Clinton,” “Demagogues and Democracy,” and “Democracy and the Election” are published online by the FDR Foundation http://fdrfoundation.org/.

Previously Dr. Koch was Associate Director of the Penn National Commission on Society, Culture and Community, a national public policy research group at the University of Pennsylvania. She served as Executive Director (1993-1997) of the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and was Director (1979-1993) of the National Historic Landmark Old Barracks Museum in Trenton, New Jersey.

 

BLANCHE WIESEN COOK is a distinguished professor of history at John Jay College and Graduate Center, City University of New York. In addition to her biography of Eleanor Roosevelt, her other books include The Declassified Eisenhower and Crystal Eastman on Women and Revolution. She was featured on air in Ken Burns’s recent documentary, The Roosevelts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

GREG ROBINSON is Professor of History at l’Université du Québec À Montréal. A specialist in North American Ethnic Studies and U.S. Political History, he has written several notable books, including By Order of the President: (Harvard UP, 2001) which uncovers President Franklin Roosevelt’s central involvement in the wartime confinement of 120,000 Japanese Americans, and A Tragedy of Democracy: (Columbia UP, 2009), winner of the 2009 AAAS History book prize, which studies Japanese American and Japanese Canadian confinement in transnational context. His book After Camp: (UC Press, 2012), winner of the Caroline Bancroft History Prize, centers on post war resettlement. His most recent book is The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches  (UP Colorado 2016) an alternative history of Japanese Americans through portraits of unusual figures.