Urban Warfare 4/10


Swarming drones, bio-threats, and human shields. How prepared is the U.S. military ready for modern urban combat?

A Fireside Chat with Bill Putnam, U.S. Army Reserve.

Wednesday, April 10, 7-8pm, in the FDR Suite (Adams B-17)

Twelve students, only. More details and RSVP link will be posted next week.


What effect does the US global military presence have on world opinion? 4/3


On the eve NATO’s 70th anniversary, as American bombers redeploy to Europe for the first time in decades, it is essential to discuss the implications of US military operations around the world.  Those operations – especially those meant to be seen – send messages to US allies and adversaries alike.  Are they the correct messages and are they received in the manner intended? 

Bryan Bailey is an Air Force cargo pilot, who in more than 17 years of operational experience has flown US military aircraft to 58 different countries on all 7 continents.  He has knowingly, and unknowingly, been part of many of those missions.  From humanitarian aid to Haiti and Iran, to counter drug support in Columbia – from airlifting Mongolian troops to the warzone, to taking Jordanians home – from combat airdrop resupply of isolated units in Afghanistan, to medivac of US wounded inside the lifesaving “golden hour” – no one questions the US military’s ability to move around the globe – at least not yet. 

As freedom of navigation through the sea, air, space and cyberspace becomes contested, how or even should the US continue to assume dominance as a global power projector?

Wednesday, April 3, 7-8pm in the FDR Suite (Adams House B-17)

Twelve students only, RSVP required: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10C0E44AEAD29A4FA7-what

 


A primer on those little ole wooden shacks out back


M

Blue Lake Ranch outhouse horse

Linda Nipp stands in front of the outhouse on the century farm known as Blue Lake Ranch where she and her husband board horses. She says the privy “is 100 years old at least and still in use.” It stands 8-feet high and is about 4-foot-square with a tin roof. The farm was once the Central Pike Dairy, operated by her grandfather, Dr. Lee Wright, a physician who also had a mule trading center and a tobacco farm in the community once called Dodoburg.

Many of you young whippersnappers may never have had the challenge of stepping into an outhouse to take care of business.

But for most of us in our seventh decade or more, spotting one of these vintage wooden structures along a stretch of country road may revive memories that do not carry the scent of nostalgia or sentimentality.

A century ago, practically every farmhouse, rural schoolhouse and church house had one or maybe two of these utilitarian sheds somewhere out back. The small building bore other names such as toilet, privy and latrine.

These often held a Sears and Roebuck catalog in lieu of toilet paper. If a catalog was not handy, then fresh, soft corn cobs would make do.

The 1950 census tallied 50 million outhouses in the U.S. By 2000, the number had trickled to…

Read more at: 

https://www.wilsonpost.com/community/a-primer-on-those-little-ole-wooden-shacks-out-back/article_0c3b5f8a-46a7-11e9-bd4b-1fafc4204246.html


Forget Trump’s Border Wall. Let’s Build F.D.R.’s International Park.


A joint U.S.-Mexico park along the Rio Grande would send a message of cooperation when the loudest words are of division.

By Dan W. Reicher

Mr. Reicher was a member of the first reported expedition to navigate the 1,800-mile-plus Rio Grande.

Big Bend National Park, on the border of Texas and Mexico. There has long been interest in creating an international park in the area.CreditCreditDavid Hensley/Moment, via Getty Images

Nearly 75 years ago, an American president was eyeing a grand project along our southern border, not to divide the United States and Mexico but to bring the two nations together. On June 12, 1944, a week after D-Day, President Franklin Roosevelt signed legislation establishing Big Bend National Park, almost a million acres along the Rio Grande in West Texas.

He followed up with a grand challenge to President Manuel Ávila Camacho of Mexico: “I do not believe that this undertaking in the Big Bend will be complete until the entire park area in this region on both sides of the Rio Grande forms one great international park.” Mr. Camacho agreed.

Still, the building of a great international park along our southern border, rather than a grim medieval wall, remains an elusive goal. But if there ever was a moment for it, this is it, and particularly in a place where time and the flowing river have already carved truly great walls along thousand-foot-deep canyons.

There was a compelling precedent for President Roosevelt’s idea. In 1932, the United States and Canada…

Read more at:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/14/opinion/trump-wall-big-bend-park.html


These Photos of a Segregated U.S. Navy Unit Were Lost for Decades. They Still Have a Story to Tell


February 22, 2019
 

Sailors assigned to work as laborers at the U.S. Naval Supply Depot on Guam.
Wayne Miller—Magnum Photos

There are many ways to photograph a black person, and it’s easy for things to go horribly wrong. America’s long history of racist imagery makes that quite clear. Wayne Miller, a white man, was notable for doing it right. In the mid-20th century, a time when American visual culture was suffused with photographs that reinforced demeaning notions about black people, Miller created deeply empathetic images with a understated, yet unmistakable anti-racist intent. He made his best known photographs of African Americans on Chicago’s South Side, between 1946 and 1948. But they were not his first.

In 1944 and 1945, while serving as a U.S. Navy photographer, he created a photographic series about a segregated all-black unit that was assigned to the Naval Supply Depot on Guam. The men called their unit “Pot Luck,” and that was the name that Miller gave to the book that he planned to publish about them. The book never appeared; its maquette, or mock-up, was lost until 2018, when one of Miller’s daughters rediscovered it. And what she found, images from which are published here for the first time, reveals…

Read more at:

http://time.com/longform/wayne-miller-pot-luck/


The Real Value Of Course Correction (Use It Early And Often)