Death in the Polis: Warfare and Urban Centers in the 21st Century 4/23

Renewed great power competition, the continued rise of forces challenging the nation state, climate change, and increasing levels of urbanization and global interconnectedness will ensure the world’s urban areas increasingly factor into US national security interests.  Any effort to secure US interests will likely involve the US military, but is it trained and ready to conduct urban operations in an era of increasing urbanization? 

Come and join Lieutenant Colonels Goedecke and Putnam for a fireside chat that will provide some deep insights.

Tuesday, April 23, 7-8pm, in the FDR Suite (Adams B-17)

Twelve students, only.

RSVP required, here: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0e44aead29a4fa7-urban

“Fake News,” Disinformation, and “Election Hacking” 11/13 (NEW DATE)

[NEW DATE AND TIME]

Concerned with foreign interventions in your elections? In your news? Do you trust the media? Should you?

You may be surprised to learn the FDR Foundation and Adams House are on the cutting edge of the struggle of democracy against disinformation. Come by to chat informally with Jed Willard about current trends in international media manipulation, defensive media monitoring and analysis, and counter propaganda.

This is an interactive discussion, limited to 14, undergraduates only if numbers allow. RSVP here:

www.SignUpGenius.com/go/10C0E44AEAD29A4FA7-fake

(There is an RSVP option for those who cannot make this time slot but are interested in future events on this topic – make sure to indicate your interest even if you can’t make it!)

Date: 11/13/2017 (Mon.)

Time: 7:00pm – 8:00pm EDT

Location: FDR Suite, B-17, Adams House

Fireside Chat: First Feminist? Eleanor Roosevelt and Women’s Rights 11/6

When her husband came out for women’s suffrage in 1911, Eleanor Roosevelt proclaimed herself “somewhat shocked as I had never given the question serious thought.” She was never a member of the Woman Suffrage Party, yet she was an avid supporter of the Women’s Trade Union League and the League of Women Voters. In the 1920s she opposed the Equal Rights Amendment, led by Alice Paul and Crystal Eastman. In her first book, Its Up to the Women, published in 1933 as her husband assumed the presidency, Roosevelt wrote that she was not interested in the abstract idea of equality with men. It did not really improve women’s ability to change society. So, was Eleanor Roosevelt a feminist? Or something else?

 

About the speaker: CYNTHIA M. KOCH is Historian in Residence and Director of History Programing for the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Foundation at Adams House, Harvard University. She was Director of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, New York (1999-2011) and subsequently Senior Adviser to the Office of Presidential Libraries, National Archives, Washington, D.C. From 2013-16 she was Public Historian in Residence at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY where she taught courses in public history and Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. Her most recent publications are “They Hated Eleanor, Too,” “Hillary R[oosevelt] Clinton,” “Demagogues and Democracy,” and “Democracy and the Election” are published online by the FDR Foundation http://fdrfoundation.org/.

Previously Dr. Koch was Associate Director of the Penn National Commission on Society, Culture and Community, a national public policy research group at the University of Pennsylvania. She served as Executive Director (1993-1997) of the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and was Director (1979-1993) of the National Historic Landmark Old Barracks Museum in Trenton, New Jersey.

7 PM, FDR Suite (B-17), Adams House

Please note: this signup is filled, but an additional date has been added, Sunday, 11/5 at 7PM. All are welcome but should the second date fill, preference will be given to undergraduates. Sign up HERE